A family of wild boars orchestrated the escape of two piglets from their cage, demonstrating high levels of intelligence and empathy in the process.

According to photographs taken by researchers, a wild boar can be seen rescuing two piglets from a trap.

The female boar can be seen strategically aiming for the wooden logs that were blocking the trap’s entrance doors.

According to scientists, this is the first time a wild boar has been observed engaging in rescue behavior.

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In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, it is revealed that a wild boar performed a daring mission to free two piglets from a trap, demonstrating high levels of intelligence and empathy in the process.

The incident, which occurred in January 2020 at the Vodradské Buiny National Nature Reserve, was documented by a team of scientists from the Czech University of Life Sciences who were on site at the time.

The wild boar trap, which was baited with corn, had been set up to assist researchers in their research into prevention measures for African Swine Fever (ASF).

Two juvenile boars were captured on camera as they became entangled in each other’s web for two hours and thirty minutes.

One fully grown female wild boar led a group of approximately eight wild boars to the location of the trap, where they were captured.

As part of her effort to free the trapped boars, the female boar charged at strategic points where wooden logs were blocking the trap’s doors.

Piloerection, which scientists believe is an indication of distress, was visible in the female boar’s mane, according to a report published in the journal Animals.

Apparently, the other boars were attempting to assist the female in the rescue operation, according to the scientists who observed it.

Approximately six minutes after beginning the rescue attempt, the female boar released the first log that had been blocking the trap’s front entrance.

The entire rescue mission lasted approximately 29 minutes, at which point the trap was dislodged and the boars were released back into the wild.

According to the researchers, based on the size and gender of the animals, it is possible that the female boar was the mother of the juvenile boar.

Rescue behavior by a wild boar has never been documented before, according to scientists, who believe this is the first documented instance of what some call a “complex form of empathy.”
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