According to a doctor, Oklahoma hospitals are being inundated with ivermectin overdoses.

In his opinion, people overdosing on an anti-parasitic drug that some people believe, without evidence, can cure or treat Covid are putting themselves at risk.
Overdoses of the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin, which many people believe can prevent or cure Covid-19 despite the lack of evidence, are contributing to delays and problems for rural hospitals and ambulance services that are struggling to cope with the resurgent pandemic, according to an Oklahoma doctor who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
Ivermectin is a parasiticide that is used to kill both internal and external parasites in livestock animals, as well as in humans at lower doses.

In an interview with KFOR, an Oklahoma television station, Dr Jason McElyea explained why you need a doctor to get a prescription for this medication. “It can be dangerous,” he said in the interview.

It was difficult for gunshot victims to reach facilities where they could receive definitive care and treatment because the [emergency rooms] were so overcrowded.

A spokesperson for the hospital said, “Ambulances are stuck at the hospital, waiting for a bed to open so they can take the patient in, and they don’t have any.” If there isn’t an ambulance available to take the call, there won’t be an ambulance available to respond to the call.”

McElyea told the Tulsa World that a colleague was forced to transfer one severely ill Covid patient to a hospital in South Dakota, which was three states to the north of where they were located.

It took several days for them to get to a [intensive care unit] because they had been in a small hospital for several days and that was the closest ICU that was available, he explained.

Oklahoma is one of the states that is struggling to cope with an increase in hospitalizations and deaths caused by a Delta virus variant that has been identified. According to the Johns Hopkins University, more than 18,400 cases and 189 deaths have been reported in Oklahoma in the last week alone. According to the same source, over 8,000 people have died in Oklahoma, out of a total of more than 647,000 across the United States.

Unvaccinated people account for the vast majority of hospitalizations and deaths in the United States. Many people have turned to ivermectin in the face of rising opposition to vaccines and public health mandates, which has been fueled by Republican politicians, conservative media, and misinformation on social media.

Earlier this week, the influential podcaster Joe Rogan, who has previously been critical of vaccines, revealed that he had tested positive for Covid and was currently being treated with ivermectin.

In Arkansas, the drug was administered to inmates at a correctional facility. Following an increase in calls to poison control centers, the states of Louisiana and Washington issued alerts. Some animal feed supply stores have run out of the drug as a result of the large number of people who have purchased it in veterinary form.

CDC officials pointed to a case in which a man consumed an injectable form of ivermectin intended for cattle, according to the organization. He was admitted to the hospital for nine days after experiencing hallucinations, confusion, tremors, and other side effects.

As McElyea explained to KFOR, growing up in a small town in a rural area meant that everyone was exposed to ivermectin by accident at some point. As a result, it is something that most people are familiar with. Because of those unintentional sticks, when trying to inoculate cattle, they are less fearful of the procedure.”

Authorities have attempted to dispel claims that ivermectin of animal-strength can be used to combat Covid-19.

In a statement, the United States Food and Drug Administration warned that taking large doses of the medication was dangerous and could result in serious harm. The FDA also stated that the medication can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, seizures, delirium, and death.

While the American Medical Association has called for a “immediate halt” to the drug’s use, other researchers are investigating whether the drug can be used against Covid-19, and federal and state regulators are keeping track of side effects and hospitalizations as part of their ongoing investigation.

A panel from the National Institutes of Health determined that there was “insufficient evidence” to support or oppose the use of the drug for Covid-19.

“Some people taking inappropriate doses have actually put themselves in worse conditions than if they had contracted Covid,” McElyea said of the situation in Oklahoma. The most terrifying one that I’ve heard about and witnessed is people who have lost their vision.

It’s important to ask yourself, if you’re taking this medication, what you’ll do if something goes wrong. What is your next step, and what is your contingency plan? If you’re going to take a medication that could have a negative impact on your health, make sure you consult with a doctor first.

In other words, it isn’t something you can just look up on the internet and decide if it is the right dose.

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