Three children are in intensive care as a result of COVID-19 in NSW, which has recorded 1,533 cases.

SCHN spokeswoman confirmed that three children with COVID-19 are currently in intensive care at the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network (SCHN).
The children suffer from underlying medical conditions, but according to the spokeswoman, they are being cared for as a result of COVID.

Through the delivery of a variety of dedicated services, “SCHN is currently supporting more than 2,000 children with COVID-19,” she explained, including the three children who are currently receiving intensive care in the hospital.

According to the spokeswoman, children who have the virus and whose parents or carers have been admitted to the hospital can access SCHN’s ‘Home in Hospital’ service.

Those who were healthy enough to be treated at home were taken care of by their VirtualKids service, which was available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, she explained.

The announcement comes as NSW broke its own COVID-19 records for the second consecutive day, with 1,533 new infections and four deaths identified in the 24 hours leading up to 8:00 p.m. on Friday, breaking the previous day’s mark.

In Sydney’s western and southern suburbs, the majority of the cases have been reported; however, there is growing concern about the deteriorating situation in the state’s regional areas, where the virus is still circulating.

Over the course of the Delta outbreak in New South Wales, nearly 100 people have tested positive in the small town of Wilcannia, which has a large Indigenous population and is about 950 kilometers west of Sydney.

The addition of nine new cases on Friday brought the total number of cases in Wilcannia to 97, which means that approximately 13% of the population of the town is infected with the virus.

Other regional areas include:

It was reported that 38 new infections were reported in the Western NSW Local Health District (LHD), with 22 occurring in Dubbo and nine occurring in Bourke.
There were 15 new cases reported in the Hunter New England LHD, with ten of them occurring in the Port Stephens local government area.
There were 17 new cases in the Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, with 12 of them occurring in Wollongong.
In the Central Coast LHD, there were 15 new cases reported.
COVID is spreading at a rapid pace in your neighborhood.
The NSW Ambulance service had its second busiest day in the state’s history on Friday, according to Health Minister Brad Hazzard, highlighting the strain placed on the state’s health system by the pandemic.

“I would just say to everyone that if you are sick, of course, and you require emergency assistance, then you should dial 000,” he explained.

We had the Commissioner for Ambulance here last week or the week before, and he was bringing attention to cases where people were using ambulances to get Band-Aids and other medical supplies.

Residents were urged to save calls for an ambulance for emergency situations only, according to the mayor.

Mr. Hazzard stated that he supported a plan to bring in additional emergency personnel to assist in driving ambulances.

Because of the expected increase in patient numbers, Ambulance Commissioner Dominic Morgan is considering implementing such a plan, according to Morgan.
None of the four people who died had received a flu shot prior to their deaths.

A woman in her 80s from south-west Sydney died at Fairfield Hospital, while a man in his 50s from Western Sydney died at Westmead Hospital. Both deaths occurred in Sydney.

Liverpool Hospital has confirmed the death of a man in his 70s from south-west Sydney.

A man in his 60s from Western Sydney passed away at his residence.

To each of those people’s families and friends, Mr Hazzard said, “The passing of a family member or friend is always extremely sad, and I really want to express the strong wishes of the community members who knew those people, and just to say we’re thinking of you.” “I want to express my condolences to each of those people’s families and friends,” Mr Hazzard said.

According to Lifeline Chair John Brogden, his organization receives 1,000 calls per day from people in New South Wales.
As a comparison, two years ago there were approximately 700 and something calls, indicating that “we are now seeing a very significant load of calls coming to us,” he explained.

However, he stated that the silver lining was that people were reaching out for assistance when they were in need.

One thousand and forty-one COVID-19 cases are being treated in hospitals, with 173 patients in intensive care, 62 of whom require mechanical ventilation.

There are 173 people in the intensive care unit, with 137 of them not having been vaccinated.

Twenty-nine people have received a single vaccination, and seven people have received a full course of vaccination.

On Friday, nearly 130,000 COVID-19 vaccines were administered throughout New South Wales.

According to the Health Minister, a “super Sunday” vaccination blitz on Sunday will make vaccines available to police, fire, and emergency services personnel who live in Sydney’s 12 local government areas of concern.

“I want to emphasize that healthcare, hospital, and aged care workers from these 12 LGAs who are of concern can also book into that super Sunday tomorrow,” Mr Hazzard said. “I want to emphasize that healthcare, hospital, and aged care workers from these 12 LGAs who are of concern can also book into that super Sunday tomorrow.”
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